Memory suppression

A question from a reader: How does the memory suppression relate to addiction? It seems to me like suppressing a memory might not be the best way to deal with it, please explain. Two reasons. First there’s a relationship between trauma and addiction. The relationship probably isn’t direct. Trauma may be more directly related to … Continue reading Memory suppression

2014’s top posts: #8

Opioid addicted brains recover and residential more effective than medication for young opioid addicts Several years back, Bill White pointed out that we’ve learned an enormous amount about the neurobiology of addiction but know nothing about the neurobiology of recovery. This week, a small study focused on just that: The researchers performed several tests to … Continue reading 2014’s top posts: #8

Opioid addicted brains recover and residential more effective than medication for young opioid addicts

Several years back, Bill White pointed out that we’ve learned an enormous amount about the neurobiology of addiction but know nothing about the neurobiology of recovery. This week, a small study focused on just that: The researchers performed several tests to assess changes in the “brain reward system” during early recovery.  After drug withdrawal, many … Continue reading Opioid addicted brains recover and residential more effective than medication for young opioid addicts

a thousand pasts and no future

“Choose [your memories] carefully. Memories are all we end up with … You’ll have a thousand pasts and no future.” –The Secret Behind Their Eyes (film) A friend shared this On Point episode with me and made a connection between it and resentments. This matter of appropriate, helpful, deliberate forgetting is very fascinating. We’ve talked before … Continue reading a thousand pasts and no future