Pediatric Ritalin Use May Affect Developing Brain, New Study Suggests

A new study identifies neurochemical changes from ritalin use:

Use of the attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drug Ritalin by young children may cause long-term changes in the developing brain, suggests a new study of very young rats by a research team at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City.

The study is among the first to probe the effects of Ritalin (methylphenidate) on the neurochemistry of the developing brain. Between 2 to18 percent of American children are thought to be affected by ADHD, and Ritalin, a stimulant similar to amphetamine and cocaine, remains one of the most prescribed drugs for the behavioral disorder.

“The changes we saw in the brains of treated rats occurred in areas strongly linked to higher executive functioning, addiction and appetite, social relationships and stress. These alterations gradually disappeared over time once the rats no longer received the drug,” notes the study’s senior author Dr. Teresa Milner, professor of neuroscience at Weill Cornell Medical College.

It will be interesting to see more research on the subject, particularly as we learn more about brain plasticity in adolescents.

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