This is your culture on pot

Medical Cannabis Growing Operation in Oakland,...

(Photo credit: Blazenhoff)

Keith Humphreys and Mark Kleiman offer some great commentary on marijuana legalization and what a legal marijuana market might look like.

First, Humphreys:

About eighty percent of the market is “commercial grade” cannabis, which has a THC content of about 5% and sells for $70 to $230 per ounce, depending on how far a buyer is from the producing farm and in what amount he or she buys. If that level of potency and price surprises you, you are probably an observer or participant in the small, nationally unrepresentative marijuana “upmarket“.

The reason for the current dominance of commercial grade pot is simple: It’s an inexpensive product for a price-sensitive population.

But, he argues price would likely drop and …

The cannabis-using population would experience a vast increase in average drug potency. Caulkins and colleagues estimate that in the past 15 years, average potency of marijuana in the U.S. has doubled. But after legalization, with the 80% commercial grade market share being almost completely supplanted by sinsemilla, average potency would roughly triple very rapidly.

This increase in exposure to highly potent cannabis is one of the mechanisms through which legalization would result in a higher prevalence of addiction (Some of the other mechanisms are discussed here). It at first seems reasonable to assume that experienced users would simply titrate their dose of higher-potency pot, making higher or lower doses equivalent from a biological viewpoint. But surprisingly, laboratory studies of experienced marijuana users show that they are in fact poor at judging the potency of cannabis.

Kleiman isn’t so certain. Here are a few of his reasons. Read the entire post for the rest of his thinking:

  • Even if high-potency product were legal, it could be heavily taxed, as whiskey is heavily taxed compared to beer.
  • In the current illicit market, “quality” and “potency” are conflated in consumers’ minds. Post-legalization, …THC could be extracted from the vegetable matter and used to “fortify” pot to any desired potency. That may push consumers’ ideas of “quality” away from potency and toward other factors.
  • Unlike alcoholic beverages, which mostly contain only a single psychoactive, cannabis contains a mix. Some consumers will want lower-THC, higher-CBD product.

Alcohol remains our one experiment with legalization of an intoxicant. Two-thirds of the alcohol consumed in the U.S. is taken in the form of beer rather than higher-potency forms.

As is so often the case, the answer here is “Hard to say; it depends.”

3 Comments

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3 responses to “This is your culture on pot

  1. Pingback: This Week in Addiction News - Addiction Issues in the News

  2. Alcohol remains our one experiment with legalization of an intoxicant since the 1930s. And most drug users weren’t criminalized until the 1970s when Nixon declared the “War on Drugs” and then in the 80s Reagan encouraged states to make there penalties stiffer and most did to get the federal cash.

    The first 150 years of our country all drugs were legal, a pretty good experiment.

  3. Reblogged this on Jersey Teapot and commented:
    Alcohol remains our one experiment with legalization of an intoxicant since the 1930s. And most drug users weren’t criminalized until the 1970s when Nixon declared the “War on Drugs” and then in the 80s Reagan encouraged states to make there penalties stiffer and most did to get the federal cash.

    The first 150 years of our country all drugs were legal, a pretty good experiment.