GlaxoSmithKline’s corruption

GlaxoSmithKline

(Photo credit: Ian Wilson)

The details are simultaneously exactly what you’d expect and shocking.

And some people wonder why we’re reluctant to embrace the latest and greatest pharmacological fad. Keep all of this in mind next time someone suggests that medicalizing addiction treatment will improve professionalism, ethics and reliance on scientific evidence.

Sham advisory boards:

Glaxo also used sham advisory boards and speakers at lavish resorts to promote depression drug Wellbutrin as an option for weight loss and a remedy for sexual dysfunction and substance addiction, according to the government. Customers were urged to use higher-than-approved dosages, the government said.

Phony continuing education programs:

GSK paid millions to doctors to promote the drug off-label during meetings sometimes held at swanky resorts, the government said. The company relied on pharmaceutical sales reps, “sham advisory boards,” and continuing medical education programs that appeared independent but were not.

Misleading doctors:

The company went to extreme lengths to promote the drugs, such as distributing a misleading medical journal article and providing doctors with meals and spa treatments that amounted to illegal kickbacks, prosecutors said.

Bribing doctors:

“GSK’s sales force bribed physicians to prescribe GSK products using every imaginable form of high priced entertainment, from Hawaiian vacations to paying doctors millions of dollars to go on speaking tours to a European pheasant hunt to tickets to Madonna concerts, and this is just to name a few,” said Carmin M. Ortiz, U.S.attorney in Massachusetts.

Widespread:

Crimes and civil violations like those in the GlaxoSmithKline case have been widespread in the pharmaceutical industry and have produced a series of case with hefty fines. One reason some have said the industry regards the fines as simply a cost of doing business is because aggressively promoting drugs to doctors for uses not officially approved — including inducing other doctors to praise the drugs to colleagues at meetings — has quickly turned numerous drugs from mediocre sellers into blockbusters, with more than $1 billion in annual sales.

Stories have noted that Pfizer agreed to a $2.3 billion settlement in 2009. Also, Johnson & Johnson settled with Arkansas for $1.2 billion for several violations, including:

…for not disclosing the risks of the antipsychotic Risperdal.

Withholding data on Paxil:

GSK allegedly participated in the publishing of medical journal articles that stated paroxetine was effective in patients under 18, when, in fact, the data showed that the opposite was true. At the same time, the company withheld study data in from two other studies in which Paxil also failed to demonstrate efficacy in treating depression in patients under 18, according to a press release from the Justice Department.

Kept safety issues secret:

…the company kept secret data on raised cardiovascular effects.

2 Comments

Filed under Controversies, Policy, Research, Treatment

2 responses to “GlaxoSmithKline’s corruption

  1. Eddie

    I believe that there is no drug that can cure alcoholism and drug addiction. Maybe the physical craving can be removed but the deeper reasons for drug use need to be addressed with the suffering individual. I got help from a structured sober living called New Life House. I am not on meds or on any other type of drug and I am living a happy and fulfilling life. Check out the New Life House website at http://www.newlifehouse.com

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